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7 documents found
1: Title: Assessment of Protein Prenylation Pathway in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.
Authors: Taheri, Mohammad, et.al. .
Journal: Journal of molecular neuroscience : MN (J Mol Neurosci), 2018 .
Snippet: No significant difference has been found in FNTA and PGGT1B expressions between cases and controls.
Affiliation: Department of Medical Genetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Urogenital Stem Cell Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Clinical Research Development Center (CRDU), Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran. Neurophysiology Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Department of Neurology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. Department of Medical Genetics, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. davood_omrani@yahoo.co.uk. Urogenital Stem Cell Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. davood_omrani@yahoo.co.uk. .
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2: Title: Protein Prenylation Constitutes an Endogenous Brake on Axonal Growth.
Authors: Li, Hai, et.al. .
Journal: Cell reports (Cell Rep), Vol. 16 (2): 545-58, 2016 .
Snippet: Accordingly, elevated levels of PGGT1B, which would be predicted to reduce sprouting, were found in motor neurons of early- versus late-onset ALS patients postmortem.
Affiliation: Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease, Columbia Stem Cell Initiative, Columbia Translational Neuroscience Initiative, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Neurology, and Neuroscience, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA. Project A.L.S./Jenifer Estess Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, New York, NY 10032, USA. Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College, City University of New York, NY 10065, USA. Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease, Columbia Stem Cell Initiative, Columbia Translational Neuroscience Initiative, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Biological Sciences and Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA. Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Neurology, and Neuroscience, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Project A.L.S./Jenifer Estess Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, New York, NY 10032, USA; Life and Health Sciences Research Institute, School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Minho, Portugal. Computational Biology, Biogen Inc., Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease, Columbia Stem Cell Initiative, Columbia Translational Neuroscience Initiative, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Neurology, and Neuroscience, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Project A.L.S./Jenifer Estess Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, New York, NY 10032, USA. Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. Center for Motor Neuron Biology and Disease, Columbia Stem Cell Initiative, Columbia Translational Neuroscience Initiative, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Rehabilitation and Regenerative Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Neurology, and Neuroscience, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA; Project A.L.S./Jenifer Estess Laboratory for Stem Cell Research, New York, NY 10032, USA; Target ALS Foundation, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: chris.henderson@biogen.com. .
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3: Title: Rho-A prenylation and signaling link epithelial homeostasis to intestinal inflammation.
Authors: López-Posadas, Rocío, et.al. .
Journal: The Journal of clinical investigation (J Clin Invest), Vol. 126 (2): 611-26, 2016 .
Snippet: Functionally, we found that mice with conditional loss of Rhoa or the gene encoding GGTase-I, Pggt1b, in IECs exhibit spontaneous chronic intestinal inflammation with accumulation of granulocytes and CD4+ T cells.
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4: Title: Therapeutic effects of microRNA-582-5p and -3p on the inhibition of bladder cancer progression.
Authors: Uchino, Keita, et.al. .
Journal: Molecular therapy : the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy (Mol Ther), Vol. 21 (3): 610-9, 2013 .
Snippet: Most interestingly, our study revealed that both strands of miR-582-5p and -3p suppressed the expression of the same set of target genes such as protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I beta subunit (PGGT1B), leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) and DIX domain containing 1 (DIXDC1).
Affiliation: National Cancer Center Research Institute, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan. .
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5: Title: Genetic studies on the functional relevance of the protein prenyltransferases in skin keratinocytes.
Authors: Lee, Roger, et.al. .
Journal: Human molecular genetics (Hum Mol Genet), Vol. 19 (8): 1603-17, 2010 .
Snippet: To explore the importance of the protein prenyltransferases for normal tissues, we used conditional knockout alleles for Fntb and Pggt1b (which encode the beta-subunits of FTase and GGTase-I, respectively) and a keratin 14-Cre transgene to create mice lacking FTase or GGTase-I in skin keratinocytes.
Affiliation: Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, LA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. .
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6: Title: Genetic mapping of the sex-linked barring gene in the chicken.
Authors: Dorshorst, B J, et.al. .
Journal: Poultry science (Poultry Sci), Vol. 88 (9): 1811-7, 2009 .
Snippet: Further analysis suggests that the causal mutation is located within a 355-kb region showing complete association with the barring phenotype and containing 5 known genes [micro-RNA 31 (miRNA-31), methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2B (CDKN2B), tripartite motif 36 (TRIM36), and protein geranylgeranyltransferase type I, beta subunit (PGGT1B)], none of which have a defined role in normal melanocyte function.
Affiliation: Department of Poultry Science, North Carolina State University, Raleigh 27695, USA. .
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7: Title: In-vivo effects of simvastatin and rosuvastatin on global gene expression in peripheral blood leucocytes in a human inflammation model.
Authors: Schmidt, Wolfgang M, et.al. .
Journal: Pharmacogenetics and genomics (Pharmacogenet Genomics), Vol. 18 (2): 109-20, 2008 .
Snippet: While the majority of LPS-induced changes were not modulated by either statin, few select genes responded differently after statin treatment, such as the genes encoding the CD32 receptor (FCGR2A) or the protein geranylgeranyltransferase 1b subunit (PGGT1B).
Affiliation: Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. wolfgang.schmidt@meduniwien.ac.at .
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