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18 documents found
1: Title: Selenocysteine-Mediated Expressed Protein Ligation of SELENOM.
Authors: Liu, Jun, et.al. .
Journal: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) (Methods Mol Biol), Vol. 1661, 2018 .
Snippet: In a subset of these selenoproteins, such as human SELENOH, SELENOM, SELENOT, SELENOV, SELENOW, and SELENOF, this redox motif is positioned immediately after the first β-sheet in a short loop, and is essential for interactions with its substrate or partners.
Affiliation: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, 136 Brown Laboratory, Newark, DE, 19716, USA. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, 136 Brown Laboratory, Newark, DE, 19716, USA. rozovsky@udel.edu. .
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2: Title: Analyses of Selenotranscriptomes and Selenium Concentrations in Response to Dietary Selenium Deficiency and Age Reveal Common and Distinct Patterns by Tissue and Sex in Telomere-Dysfunctional Mice.
Authors: Cao, Lei, et.al. .
Journal: The Journal of nutrition (J Nutr), 2017 .
Snippet: Among these mRNAs, selenoprotein H (Selenoh), selenoprotein M (Selenom), selenoprotein W (Selenow), methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase 1 (MsrB1), Gpx1, Gpx3, thioredoxin reductase 1 (Txnrd1), Txnrd2, selenoprotein S (Selenos), selenoprotein F (Selenof), and selenoprotein O (Selenoo) responded in parallel to dietary selenium deficiency and age in ≥1 tissue or sex, or both.
Affiliation: Departments of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion and. Grand Forks Human Nutrition Center, Agricultural Research Service, USDA, Grand Forks, ND; and. Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD. Mathematics and Statistics, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS. Departments of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion and wcheng@fsnhp.msstate.edu. .
3: Title: Selenoprotein Gene Nomenclature.
Authors: Gladyshev, Vadim N, et.al. .
Journal: The Journal of biological chemistry (J Biol Chem), Vol. 291 (46): 24036-24040, 2016 .
Snippet: This nomenclature applies to SELENOF (selenoprotein F, the 15-kDa selenoprotein, SEP15), SELENOH (selenoprotein H, SELH, C11orf31), SELENOI (selenoprotein I, SELI, EPT1), SELENOK (selenoprotein K, SELK), SELENOM (selenoprotein M, SELM), SELENON (selenoprotein N, SEPN1, SELN), SELENOO (selenoprotein O, SELO), SELENOP (selenoprotein P, SeP, SEPP1, SELP), SELENOS (selenoprotein S, SELS, SEPS1, VIMP), SELENOT (selenoprotein T, SELT), SELENOV (selenoprotein V, SELV), and SELENOW (selenoprotein W, SELW, SEPW1).
Affiliation: From the Department of Medicine, Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, vgladyshev@rics.bwh.harvard.edu. the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142. the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics (MBB), Division of Biochemistry, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813. the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC), European Bioinformatics Institute-European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL-EBI), Hinxton CB10 1SD, United Kingdom. the Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232. the Molecular Biology of Selenium Section, Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892. the Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. the Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, CIRI, INSERM U1111, and CNRS/ENS UMR5308, 69007 Lyon, France. the Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Developmental Genetics, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany. the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854. the Department of Pathology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607. the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195. the Pathophysiology of Striated Muscles Laboratory, Unit of Functional and Adaptive Biology (BFA), University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, BFA, UMR CNRS 8251, 75250 Paris, France. the AP-HP, Centre de Référence Maladies Neuromusculaires Paris-Est, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France. the Universidad de la República, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay. the Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, I-35121 Padova, Italy. the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), 08003 Barcelona, Spain. the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002 Barcelona, Spain. the Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. the Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom. the Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom. the The Medical School, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH, United Kingdom. the Department of Biochemistry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405. the Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112. the Hubei Key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry & Materia Medica, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Peoples Republic of China. the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 42415, South Korea. the College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 02841, South Korea. the Institute for Experimental Endocrinology, Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, D-13353 Berlin, Germany. the Architecture et Réactivité de l'ARN, Université de Strasbourg, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, 67084 Strasbourg, France. the KSQ Therapeutics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139. the School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, South Korea. the Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853. the Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology and Ecology, College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060, Guangdong Province, Peoples Republic of China. the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 75794 Paris, France. From the Department of Medicine, Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115. the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802. the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom. the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716. the Cátedra de Inmunología, Facultad de Química, Instituto de Higiene, CP11600 Montevideo, Uruguay. the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717. the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Institut für Biochemie und Molekularbiologie, 53115 Bonn, Germany. the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607. the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706. the Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, Towson, Maryland 21252, and. the Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, College of Agricultural Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331. .
4: Title: Rotational stability of toric soft contact lenses during natural viewing conditions.
Authors: Zikos, George A, et.al. .
Journal: Optometry and vision science : official publication of the American Academy of Optometry (Optometry Vision Sci), Vol. 84 (11): 1039-45, 2007 .
Snippet: Four tasks involving saccades were performed: settling time with free viewing, reading, visual search, and execution of large versional tasks.
Affiliation: Manhattan Vision Associates/Institute for Vision Research, New York, New York, USA. .
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5: Title: "Bothersome blur": a functional unit of blur perception.
Authors: Ciuffreda, Kenneth J, et.al. .
Journal: Vision research (Vision Res), Vol. 46 (6-7): 895-901, 2006 .
Snippet: However, both were significantly smaller than for the isolated 20/200 E (1.80 D).
Affiliation: SUNY/State College of Optometry, Department of Vision Sciences, New York, NY 10036, USA. kciuffreda@sunyopt.edu .
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6: Title: Dynamic interactions of eye and head movements when reading with single-vision and progressive lenses in a simulated computer-based environment.
Authors: Han, Ying, et.al. .
Journal: Investigative ophthalmology & visual science (Invest Ophth Vis Sci), Vol. 44 (4): 1534-45, 2003 .
Snippet: These eye movement and head movement results may contribute to the reduced reading rate and related symptoms reported by some PAL wearers.
Affiliation: Institute for Vision Research/Manhattan Vision Associates, New York, New York 10022, USA. research@visionbylaser.com .
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7: Title: Static aspects of eye and head movements during reading in a simulated computer-based environment with single-vision and progressive lenses.
Authors: Han, Ying, et.al. .
Journal: Investigative ophthalmology & visual science (Invest Ophth Vis Sci), Vol. 44 (1): 145-53, 2003 .
Snippet: PURPOSE: Reading with two different intermediate progressive lens designs was investigated regarding eye and head movement patterns and compared with movement patterns with a conventional single vision lens in a computer-based work environment.
Affiliation: Institute for Vision Research/Manhattan Vision Associates, 160 East 56th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA. research@visionbylaser.com .
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8: Title: Assessing visual performance with progressive addition lenses.
Authors: Selenow, Arkady, et.al. .
Journal: Optometry and vision science : official publication of the American Academy of Optometry (Optometry Vision Sci), Vol. 79 (8): 502-5, 2002 .
Snippet: To assess whether this limitation results in diminished visual performance, PAL's were compared with single-vision lenses in four different types of reading tasks in a computer workplace environment.
Affiliation: Manhattan Vision Associates, Institute for Vision Research, New York, New York 10022, USA. research@visionbylaser.com .
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9: Title: Reduction of asthenopia after accommodative facility training.
Authors: Cooper, J, et.al. .
Journal: American journal of optometry and physiological optics (Am J Optom Physiol Opt), Vol. 64 (6): 430-6, 1987 .
Snippet: Five patients reporting asthenopia secondary to accommodative deficiencies underwent automated accommodative facility training.
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10: Title: Vision function recovery during orthoptic therapy in an adult esotropic amblyope.
Authors: Selenow, A, et.al. .
Journal: Journal of the American Optometric Association (J Am Optom Assoc), Vol. 57 (2): 132-40, 1986 .
Snippet: Orthoptic therapy was instituted in a 29-year-old patient having moderate amblyopia, constant small-angle esotropia, and large and steady eccentric fixation.
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11: Title: Prognostic value of laser interferometric visual acuity in amblyopia therapy.
Authors: Selenow, A, et.al. .
Journal: Investigative ophthalmology & visual science (Invest Ophth Vis Sci), Vol. 27 (2): 273-7, 1986 .
Snippet: Since grating test patterns generally yield optimal visual acuity in amblyopic eyes, the authors sought to determine if pre-therapy laser interferometric grating visual acuity would predict conventional post-therapy visual acuity in functional amblyopia.
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12: Title: Clinical assessment of accommodative facility in symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals.
Authors: Levine, S, et.al. .
Journal: Journal of the American Optometric Association (J Am Optom Assoc), Vol. 56 (4): 286-90, 1985 .
Snippet: In single session results, there was a trend for the average accommodative flipper rate to decrease as symptom level increased.
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13: Title: Results of surgical treatment of intermittent divergent strabismus.
Authors: Flax, N, et.al. .
Journal: American journal of optometry and physiological optics (Am J Optom Physiol Opt), Vol. 62 (2): 100-4, 1985 .
Snippet: Many other papers were located but were excluded because they either failed to state the criteria used, lumped exotropia and esotropia together in their reported successes, or used orthoptics along with surgery.
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14: Title: Orthoptic effects on accommodation and related visual functions in an adult alternating esotrope.
Authors: Schnider, C M, et.al. .
Journal: Ophthalmic & physiological optics : the journal of the British College of Ophthalmic Opticians (Optometrists) (Ophthal Physl Opt), Vol. 5 (4): 425-33, 1985 .
Snippet: This case provides the first laboratory documentation of orthoptic effects on accommodation in an adult strabismic.
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15: Title: Reduction of asthenopia in patients with convergence insufficiency after fusional vergence training.
Authors: Cooper, J, et.al. .
Journal: American journal of optometry and physiological optics (Am J Optom Physiol Opt), Vol. 60 (12): 982-9, 1983 .
Snippet: A matched-subjects control group crossover design was used to reduce placebo effects.
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16: Title: Use of forced preferential looking for measurement of visual acuity in a population of neurologically impaired children.
Authors: Duckman, R H, et.al. .
Journal: American journal of optometry and physiological optics (Am J Optom Physiol Opt), Vol. 60 (10): 817-21, 1983 .
Snippet: The forced preferential looking (FPL) technique has been used clinically, to assess visual acuity in infants for the past decade.
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17: Title: Vision function recovery during orthoptic therapy in an exotropic amblyope with high unilateral myopia.
Authors: Selenow, A, et.al. .
Journal: American journal of optometry and physiological optics (Am J Optom Physiol Opt), Vol. 60 (8): 659-66, 1983 .
Snippet: Orthoptic therapy was instituted in a 6 1/2-year-old patient having deep amblyopia, constant exotropia, and high unilateral myopia.
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18: Title: Static aspects of accommodation in human amblyopia.
Authors: Ciuffreda, K J, et.al. .
Journal: American journal of optometry and physiological optics (Am J Optom Physiol Opt), Vol. 60 (6): 436-49, 1983 .
Snippet: This included former amblyopes who had received successful orthoptic therapy in their youth, which suggested lack of complete and/or maintained recovery of accommodative function, and strabismics without amblyopia, which suggested that the effects of strabismic suppression contributed to the accommodative deficits found in some strabismic amblyopes.
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