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MAK3 Mak3p

mak3, Mak3p
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Top mentioned proteins: Nat3, Arylamine N-Acetyltransferase, TE2, ACID, CAN
Papers on mak3
Yeast N(alpha)-terminal acetyltransferases are associated with ribosomes.
Sherman et al., Rochester, United States. In J Cell Biochem, 2008
Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three major NATs, designated NatA, NatB, and NatC, with each having catalytic subunits Ard1p, Nat3p, and Mak3p, respectively.
Lysine 3 acetylation regulates the phosphorylation of yeast 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase under hypo-osmotic stress.
Eschrich et al., Göttingen, Germany. In Biol Chem, 2005
N-terminal acetylation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is catalysed by any of three N-terminal acetyltransferases (NAT), NatA, NatB, and NatC, which contain the catalytic subunits Ard1p, Nat3p and Mak3p, respectively.
Composition and function of the eukaryotic N-terminal acetyltransferase subunits.
Review
Sherman et al., Rochester, United States. In Biochem Biophys Res Commun, 2003
Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), NatA, NatB, and NatC, composed of the following catalytic and auxiliary subunits: Ard1p and Nat1p (NatA); Nat3p and Mdm20p (NatB); and Mak3p, Mak10, and Mak31p (NatC).
Cytoplasmic N-terminal protein acetylation is required for efficient photosynthesis in Arabidopsis.
Leister et al., Köln, Germany. In Plant Cell, 2003
The mutation responsible was localized to AtMAK3, which encodes a homolog of the yeast protein Mak3p.
N-terminal acetyltransferases and sequence requirements for N-terminal acetylation of eukaryotic proteins.
Review
Sherman et al., Rochester, United States. In J Mol Biol, 2003
N(alpha)-terminal acetylation occurs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by any of three N-terminal acetyltransferases (NAT), NatA, NatB, and NatC, which contain Ard1p, Nat3p and Mak3p catalytic subunits, respectively.
N-Terminal modifications of the 19S regulatory particle subunits of the yeast proteasome.
Hirano et al., Yokohama, Japan. In Arch Biochem Biophys, 2003
By using nat1, nat3, and mak3 deletion mutants, we found that 8 subunits, Rpt4, Rpt5, Rpt6, Rpn2, Rpn3, Rpn5, Rpn6, and Rpn8, were NatA substrates, and that 2 subunits, Rpt3 and Rpn11, were NatB substrates.
NatC Nalpha-terminal acetyltransferase of yeast contains three subunits, Mak3p, Mak10p, and Mak31p.
Sherman et al., Rochester, United States. In J Biol Chem, 2001
The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three types of N(alpha)-terminal acetyltransferases, NatA, NatB, and NatC, with each having a different catalytic subunit, Ard1p, Nat3p, and Mak3p, respectively, and each acetylating different sets of proteins with different N(alpha)-terminal regions.
Peroxide sensors for the fission yeast stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.
Millar et al., London, United Kingdom. In Mol Biol Cell, 2001
Mcs4p acts in a conserved phospho-relay system initiated by two PAS/PAC domain-containing histidine kinases, Mak2p and Mak3p.
N(alpha)-acetylation and proteolytic activity of the yeast 20 S proteasome.
Hirano et al., Yokohama, Japan. In J Biol Chem, 2000
In yeast, there are at least three NATs: NAT1, MAK3, and NAT3.
The action of N-terminal acetyltransferases on yeast ribosomal proteins.
Sherman et al., Bloomington, United States. In J Biol Chem, 2000
Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to determine the state of N-terminal acetylation of 68 ribosomal proteins from a normal strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and from the ard1-Delta, nat3-Delta, and mak3-Delta mutants (), each lacking a catalytic subunit of three different N-terminal acetyltransferases.
Double-stranded and single-stranded RNA viruses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.
Review
Wickner, Bethesda, United States. In Annu Rev Microbiol, 1991
Cellular functions that promote viral replication include the MAK3-encoded N-acetyltransferase whose modification of the gag N terminus is necessary for L-A virus assembly.
Genetic Control of L-a and L-(Bc) Dsrna Copy Number in Killer Systems of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE.
Wickner et al., Gembloux, Belgium. In Genetics, 1984
The MAK3, MAK10 and PET18 gene products are necessary for L-A maintenance and replication, but mutations in these genes do not affect L-(BC) copy number.
Two biochemically and genetically different forms of L dsRNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exist: One form, L2, is correlated.
Mitchell et al., London, United Kingdom. In Curr Genet, 1983
L2 dsRNA was shown to be dependent upon MAK3, MAK10 and PES1 but not MAK1 nuclear genes for its maintenance.
Plasmids controlled exclusion of the K2 killer double-stranded RNA plasmid of yeast.
Impact
Wickner, In Cell, 1980
[EXL] replication depends on at least the products of MAK1, MAK3, MAK10 and PET18.
Deletion of mitochondrial DNA bypassing a chromosomal gene needed for maintenance of the killer plasmid of yeast.
Wickner, Bethesda, United States. In Genetics, 1977
Although the absence of mitochondrial DNA bypasses mak10-1, it does not bypass pets-1, mak1-1, mak3-1, mak4-1, mak5-1, mak6-1, mak7-1, or mak8-1.
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