gopubmed logo
 
find other proteinsAll proteins
GoPubMed Proteins lists recent and important papers and reviews for proteins. Page last changed on 08 Dec 2016.

Interleukin 26

IL-26, AK155, interleukin-26
This gene was identified by its overexpression specifically in herpesvirus samimiri-transformed T cells. The encoded protein is a member of the IL10 family of cytokines. It is a secreted protein and may function as a homodimer. This protein is thought to contribute to the transformed phenotype of T cells after infection by herpesvirus samimiri. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008] (from NCBI)
Sponsored links
Papers on IL-26
An unexpected discovery of two interferon gamma-like genes along with interleukin (IL)-22 and -26 from teleost: IL-22 and -26 genes have been described for the first time outside mammals.
GeneRIF
Savan et al., Miyazaki, Japan. In Mol Immunol, 2006
Expression analysis of IL-22, IL-26 and two IFN-gamma genes suggests an active role of these genes in immune responses in fish.
The T-cell lymphokine interleukin-26 targets epithelial cells through the interleukin-20 receptor 1 and interleukin-10 receptor 2 chains.
GeneRIF
Fickenscher et al., Cambridge, United Kingdom. In J Biol Chem, 2004
sensitivity to recombinant interleukin-26(IL-26) of various cell lines strictly correlated with the expression of IL-20 receptor 1 and blocking antibodies against either IL-10 receptor 2 or IL-20 receptor 1 inhibited IL-26-dependent signal transduction
Cutting edge: IL-26 signals through a novel receptor complex composed of IL-20 receptor 1 and IL-10 receptor 2.
GeneRIF
Kotenko et al., Bethesda, United States. In J Immunol, 2004
The active receptor complex for IL-26 is a heterodimer composed of two receptor proteins: IL-20 receptor 1 and IL-10 receptor 2. Signaling through the IL-26 receptor results in activation of STAT1 and STAT3.
Polymorphisms in the interferon-gamma/interleukin-26 gene region contribute to sex bias in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis.
GeneRIF
Rooney et al., Belfast, United Kingdom. In Arthritis Rheum, 2003
common polymorphisms in the IFNgamma/IL-26 gene region may contribute to sex bias in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis, by distorting the propensity of female carriers versus male carriers to contract this disease.
share on facebooktweetadd +1mail to friends