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Olfactory receptor, family 51, subfamily E, member 1

D-GPCR, Dresden G protein-coupled receptor, GPR136, PSGR2, olfactory receptor family 51 subfamily E member 1, OR51E1
Olfactory receptors interact with odorant molecules in the nose, to initiate a neuronal response that triggers the perception of a smell. The olfactory receptor proteins are members of a large family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) arising from single coding-exon genes. Olfactory receptors share a 7-transmembrane domain structure with many neurotransmitter and hormone receptors and are responsible for the recognition and G protein-mediated transduction of odorant signals. The olfactory receptor gene family is the largest in the genome. The nomenclature assigned to the olfactory receptor genes and proteins for this organism is independent of other organisms. [provided by RefSeq, Jul 2008] (from NCBI)
Top mentioned proteins: GPCR, Rhodopsin, ACID, CAN, Tec
Papers on D-GPCR
The Olfactory Receptor OR51E1 Is Present along the Gastrointestinal Tract of Pigs, Co-Localizes with Enteroendocrine Cells and Is Modulated by Intestinal Microbiota.
Bosi et al., Bologna, Italy. In Plos One, 2014
UNLABELLED: The relevance of the butyrate-sensing olfactory receptor OR51E1 for gastrointestinal (GIT) functioning has not been considered so far.
Identification of odorant-receptor interactions by global mapping of the human odorome.
Taboureau et al., Denmark. In Plos One, 2013
Using this new approach, we proposed and validated new bioactivities for odorant molecules and OR2W1, OR51E1 and OR5P3.
Olfactory receptor 51E1 as a novel target for diagnosis in somatostatin receptor-negative lung carcinoids.
Tsolakis et al., Milano, Italy. In J Mol Endocrinol, 2013
This study aimed to investigate whether olfactory receptor 51E1 (OR51E1) may be a potential target for LCs.
Olfactory receptor 51E1 protein as a potential novel tissue biomarker for small intestine neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Giandomenico et al., Uppsala, Sweden. In Eur J Endocrinol, 2013
The olfactory receptor, family 51, subfamily E, member 1 (OR51E1) has been reported as a potential novel SI-NEC marker, without protein expression recognition.
Expression profile of ectopic olfactory receptors determined by deep sequencing.
Gisselmann et al., Bochum, Germany. In Plos One, 2012
In several tissues, we could detect broadly expressed ORs such as OR2W3 and OR51E1.
Profiling of ileal carcinoids.
Review
Nilsson, G├Âteborg, Sweden. In Neuroendocrinology, 2012
Candidate genes for targeted therapy included ERBB2/HER2, DAD1, PRKCA, RYBP, CASP1, CASP4, CASP5, VMAT1, RET, APLP1, OR51E1, GPR112, SPOCK1, RUNX1, and MIR133A.
Novel markers for enterochromaffin cells and gastrointestinal neuroendocrine carcinomas.
Giandomenico et al., Uppsala, Sweden. In Mod Pathol, 2009
We identified six novel marker genes for neuroendocrine carcinoma cells: paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 (PNMA2), testican-1 precursor (SPOCK1), serpin A10 (SERPINA10), glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA 2 (GRIA2), G protein-coupled receptor 112 (GPR112) and olfactory receptor family 51 subfamily E member 1 (OR51E1).
Deorphanization of Dresden G protein-coupled receptor for an odorant receptor.
Koishi et al., Tokyo, Japan. In J Recept Signal Transduct Res, 2006
Dresden G protein-coupled receptor (D-GPCR) is one of orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR).
Quantitative multi-gene expression profiling of primary prostate cancer.
Meye et al., Dresden, Germany. In Prostate, 2006
METHODS: Quantitative PCR (QPCR) assays with site-specific hybridization probes were established for four housekeeping genes (GAPDH, HPRT, PBGD, TBP) and nine prostate-related genes (AibZIP, D-GPCR, EZH2, PCA3, PDEF, prostein, PSA, PSCA, TRPM8).
The prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptors PSGR and PSGR2 are prostate cancer biomarkers that are complementary to alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase.
GeneRIF
Ittmann et al., Houston, United States. In Prostate, 2006
expression of PSGR and PSGR2 relative to AMACR in prostate cancer; AMACR was the most overexpressed, but in some cases expression of AMACR was not significantly elevated while PSGR and/or PSGR2 were substantially elevated
Transcript quantification of Dresden G protein-coupled receptor (D-GPCR) in primary prostate cancer tissue pairs.
Meye et al., Dresden, Germany. In Cancer Lett, 2006
Recently, we identified the novel protein D-GPCR (Dresden G protein-coupled receptor) which is selectively overexpressed in human prostate cancer (PCa) and belongs to the subfamily of odorant-like orphan GPCRs.
PSGR2, a novel G-protein coupled receptor, is overexpressed in human prostate cancer.
GeneRIF
Liu et al., Houston, United States. In Int J Cancer, 2006
Results suggest that PSGR2 may be useful as a tissue marker and molecular target for the early detection and treatment of human prostate cancers.
D-GPCR: a novel putative G protein-coupled receptor overexpressed in prostate cancer and prostate.
Rieber et al., Dresden, Germany. In Biochem Biophys Res Commun, 2004
We identified the novel protein D-GPCR that is selectively overexpressed in human prostate cancer and prostate and belongs to the subfamily of odorant-like orphan G protein-coupled receptors.
High-throughput modeling of human G-protein coupled receptors: amino acid sequence alignment, three-dimensional model building, and receptor library screening.
Rognan et al., Illkirch-Graffenstaden, France. In J Chem Inf Comput Sci, 2004
A 3-D GPCR target library of 277 receptors has consequently been setup.
Seven evolutionarily conserved human rhodopsin G protein-coupled receptors lacking close relatives.
Schi├Âth et al., Uppsala, Sweden. In Febs Lett, 2003
We report seven new members of the superfamily of human G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) found by searches in the human genome databases, termed GPR100, GPR119, GPR120, GPR135, GPR136, GPR141, and GPR142.
Novel human G-protein-coupled receptors.
GeneRIF
O'Dowd et al., Toronto, Canada. In Biochem Biophys Res Commun, 2003
This publication uses 'GPR136' as a name for this gene.
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